Item #6907 Provo Nos. 1–15 [and] Extra Bulletin [and] Provo [complete run, with Belgian 1966 facsimile no. 1 and 1967 counter-publication]
Provo Nos. 1–15 [and] Extra Bulletin [and] Provo [complete run, with Belgian 1966 facsimile no. 1 and 1967 counter-publication]
Provo Nos. 1–15 [and] Extra Bulletin [and] Provo [complete run, with Belgian 1966 facsimile no. 1 and 1967 counter-publication]
Provo Nos. 1–15 [and] Extra Bulletin [and] Provo [complete run, with Belgian 1966 facsimile no. 1 and 1967 counter-publication]
Provo Nos. 1–15 [and] Extra Bulletin [and] Provo [complete run, with Belgian 1966 facsimile no. 1 and 1967 counter-publication]
Provo Nos. 1–15 [and] Extra Bulletin [and] Provo [complete run, with Belgian 1966 facsimile no. 1 and 1967 counter-publication]
Provo Nos. 1–15 [and] Extra Bulletin [and] Provo [complete run, with Belgian 1966 facsimile no. 1 and 1967 counter-publication]

Provo Nos. 1–15 [and] Extra Bulletin [and] Provo [complete run, with Belgian 1966 facsimile no. 1 and 1967 counter-publication]

Amsterdam: Provo, 1965–1967. In original illustrated self-wraps. Various sizes, approximately 4 x 11 1/2 in. to 8 3/4 x 12 in. 12–45 pp. per issue. All very good to near fine. Item #6907

A rare complete run of the official periodical of the anarchic, Situationist-influenced countercultural Provo movement in the Netherlands, with a facsimile of the first issue, produced just a year later by the Belgian Provo paper, Revo, and the only issue of the counter-publication produced in 1967.

Founded on May 25, 1965 in the Netherlands, the countercultural Provo movement sought to provoke violent responses from the Dutch police via non-violent happenings that combined absurdist humor and civil disobedience. A radical urbanist and environmentalist project, the Provos proposed several action plans for the city of Amsterdam, instituted an ad-hoc bike share program, squatting abandoned housing, proposed a plan for shared electric cars, advocated widespread sex education and contraceptives, and proposed a disarming of the police. With internal strife rising, the movement began to be accepted by mainstream culture, most notably with the 1967 election of a Provo representative; it was disbanded and a funeral was held to mark the occasion on May 13, 1967.

Five issues of Provo (1, 2, 3, 4, and 10) feature brick covers, and the first three issues of Provo were wrapped in brick-patterned dollhouse wallpaper. This recurring motif reflects Provo’s emphasis on the connection between the city and printed matter, transforming urban infrastructure into a blank canvas for expression.

Heavily illustrated, the run includes contributions from Roel Van Dujin, Olaf Stoop, Ab Pruis, Rob Stolk, Constant Nieuwenhuys, Hans Tuynman, Hans Metz, Peter Bronkhorst, Peter Tuynman, Martijn Ananar, Robert Jasper Grootveld, Thom Jaspers, Garmt Kroeze, Auke Boersma, and Luud Schimmelpenninck. Preceded by the Nozem subculture, Provo was deeply influential for generations of Dutch counterculture: anarchist group Kabouters, the Nieuwmarket movement, various squatting movements, and ultimately Dutch punk.

This collection also includes a scarce rival edition to the original Provo, published by B. A. Lans, Jil, Renie, Vincent and Joost B. Produced in only one issue, the front wrapper features the text “Provo is dood! Leve Provo!” [“Provo is dead! Long live Provo!”].

“A monthly sheet for anarchists, provos, beatniks, pleiners, scissors-grinders, jailbirds, simple simon stylites, magicians, pacifists, potato-chip chaps, charlatans, philosophers, germ-carriers, grand masters of the queen’s horse, happeners, vegetarians, syndicalists, santy clauses, kindergarten teachers, agitators, pyromaniacs, assistant assistants, scratchers and syphilitics, secret police, and other riff-raff.” – from No. 12

A comprehensive collection of the periodicals of the short-lived Provo movement.

Price: $3,000.00