Catalogs

The Joey Arias Costume Collection

The Joey Arias Costume Collection

Joey Arias (b. 1949) is a performance artist, cabaret singer, and drag artist, whose collected costume archive spans a singular career from the 1970s to present day. Presented here are 26 highlights from Arias’ extensive collection of costume and couture worn for performances in clubs, theaters, and festivals; as well as in movies, music videos, and television. 

Please send inquiries, including for pricing for complete collection, to info@boo-hooray.com. Items will be shipped at cost.

The Klaus Nomi Costume Collection

The Klaus Nomi Costume Collection

Klaus Nomi, (January 22, 1944 – August 6, 1983), was a German-born vocalist and performance artist with roots in opera, as well as close friend and collaborator to Joey Arias. 

Nomi’s aesthetic sensibility, strongly expressed through his unique garb, set the standard for downtown and New Wave style. The costumes included in this collection are emblematic of his style, and all are unique and designed specifically for Nomi. Many of the pieces were fabricated after Nomi’s designs by costumer Jimmy Meyer, who worked in theater, and Katy K, best known for her fantastical Western-inspired pieces. These 11 pieces, all in excellent condition, are unique documents of his artistic vision and the ways in which his costuming was at the cutting edge of downtown fashion.

Please send inquiries, including for pricing for complete collection, to info@boo-hooray.com. Items will be shipped at cost.

Catalog #21: Hardcore

Catalog #21: Hardcore

Boo-Hooray is pleased to present our 21st antiquarian catalog dedicated to hardcore punk. Emerging from the punk scene of the late-1970s, hardcore was louder, faster, and angrier than anything that had come before, combining raw, crunchy rhythms and jarring tempo shifts with lyrics that provided seething commentary on the state of music, politics, and culture. At a time when the music industry was veering away from hard-edge punk in favor of more radio-friendly New Wave bands, hardcore actively reaffirmed punk’s fury and rejection of commercialism and the mainstream.

Catalog #20: Jack Smith

Catalog #20: Jack Smith

Boo-Hooray is pleased to present our twentieth antiquarian catalog, dedicated to Jack Smith, the singular filmmaker, photographer, performance artist, visual artist, and icon of homosexual sensibility.

J. Hoberman characterized Jack Smith as a “terminally underground, wildly uncommercial photographer, filmmaker, performance artist, and all-around difficult personality.” Each of these respective descriptors is represented in the catalog, which contains voluminous photography (nos. 2-3, 14-15, 17-29, 31-34); drawings (nos. 13, 35-51); ephemera and publications (items no. 52-76); scripts and photo documentation of Smith’s performances (items no. 6-7); manuscript letters (items no. 5, 60); and other art crust from one of America’s most original artists of the post-war avant-garde.

Shortlist #52: Unknown Commerce

Shortlist #52: Unknown Commerce

Boo-Hooray is proud to present Unknown Commerce, our 52nd shortlist compiling rare and vintage Joy Division records and merchandise, alongside some of the most scandalous uses and abuses of Peter Saville’s Unknown Pleasures design in pop culture. The graphic representation of a dying star lifted from the 1977 Cambridge Encyclopedia on Astronomy marked an early peak for Saville’s collaboration with Tony Wilson in particular, and Factory Records in general. Alongside the band’s often spare and moody sound, it was a manifesto of minimalism done punk.

Ben Morea: Full Circle, 1964-Present

Ben Morea: Full Circle, 1964-Present

For more than five decades, Ben Morea has been a key figure at the intersection of art and activism. Although his anarchist provocations are well documented, his artwork has only recently started to be recognized for its place in post-war painting. “Full Circle” is organized around the recurring symbol of the circle in Morea’s body of work.

The exhibition features some of the artist’s earliest paintings from the 1960s, as well as selections from more recent String Theory, Tantric, and his current Animist series spanning the 1990s to today. Accompanying the paintings is a full run of Morea’s anarchist periodical Black Mask, reflecting his contributions to 1960s counterculture and political radicalism.

“Ben Morea: Full Circle, 1964–Present” underscores the continuity in Morea’s artistic explorations and the enduring relevance of political interventions in the cultural sphere.

Curated by Daylon Orr.